Opportunity For A Seasoned Freelance Recruiter/Sales Consultant with RIMS

RIMS zealous crop

We at ‘Resources In Motorsport’ are currently looking to capitalise on our progress and would like to talk to freelance recruiters and sales consultants with extensive experience working with motorsport teams and motorsport supplying companies. This contract would be performance based where the rewards are significant for the right person. The successful candidate will work alongside the directors to maximise client development and sales. If you have the desire and drive to succeed we have the tools and set up to provide you with the opportunities.

Qualifications:
In order to be successful in this role you will have to:

  • … be an excellent communicator and solution oriented.
  • … be well presented and articulate.
  • … be very organised.
  • … be very responsive in communicating with clients, candidates and colleagues.
  • … have a proven track record in sourcing, closing and managing key accounts in a B2B2C environment
  • … have significant experience working with motorsport teams and supplying companies.
  • … have thorough understanding of the job functions in motorsport.
  • … have enthusiasm that is contagious.
  • … thoroughly understand what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur.

The opportunity is suitable for budding as well as seasoned entrepreneurs as our company is very much an entrepreneurial environment; we get the job done! This is not a salaried employment opportunity.

Contact: Christopher Lembke, christopher@resourcesinmotorsport.co.uk

About RIMS:
Motorsport is where people with particular drive and ambition come together to create extraordinary opportunities for innovation and development. In such a specialist field you need specialists to find those candidates and who understand the intricacies of the functions they have to fill. ‘Resources In Motorsport’ (RIMS) does not bring you your ‘run-of-the-mill’ high street type of recruiting. We are focused on bring quality candidates and employers together in an efficient manner. With our 25 years+ in the industry we understand the characteristics and skill set that Teams are looking for. Our services function as an extension of your current capabilities:
• We head hunt and target particular candidates according to our employer client needs.
• We use clever means to attract a range of quality candidates for permanent as well as contract positions.
• We assist employers in matters of Human Resources Management, whether it is continuous or on a project basis.
• We consult and manage high profile candidates seeking new opportunities in Motorsport.

 

Advertisements

1 Candidate + 1 Recruiter = 1 Common Goal

High five

We thought it prudent to give any job seeker out there some advise in working with recruiters. It certainly is neither brain surgery nor rocket science, but a few pointers might very well be in order.

The base concept is simple; recruiters are in business to make money (surprised?), placing candidates generates revenue and doing so effectively creates efficiencies which creates more opportunities for the recruiter, which in turn creates opportunities for candidates. Candidates are in the business of landing their dream job and recruiters can help them open doors and find opportunities the candidate would not otherwise have known about. Hence, as the title of this article suggests, candidates and recruiters have a common goal: Find a job for candidates and get them hired. Now of course for recruiters that have their eyes on the long term viability of the business will also be focused on getting the right candidate for the right job. However simplified this analysis might be, it holds true in most cases. Below you have our list of top suggestions on how to best work with your recruiter:

  1. Trust that your recruiter is looking after your best interest. Don’t get upset if you aren’t contacted about a job that you would not have a chance of landing anyway. Your recruiter does not want to waste anyone’s time and will only let you know about opportunities where you have a real chance.
  2. Honesty goes a long way! If you are honest you will give your recruiter the tools to work his/her magic to get you in the door. If you withhold information that causes problems, you can see where your chances are going to end up.
  3. Do your homework. It is a two way street; your recruiter will give you an insight and knowledge that you wouldn’t be able to get anywhere else, so return the favour by reading up on the businesses that you are trying to get a job with and also absorb any information your recruiter provides you with.
  4. Have your wits about you. If a recruiter contacts you about a job that you have already applied for, it might be a good idea to tell him/her. Recruiters will only be able to collect a fee from the employer if the recruiter is the one making the introduction. It is surprising how often this problem comes up.
  5. It’s a partnership. You are both working towards a common goal, so to achieve the best results, i.e. you getting that dream job, view your recruiter as a partner in the process. Ask them for advice and tell them if you are thinking of applying to a job, he/she might have contacts there that can help.
  6. Be responsive. If you are serious about pursuing an opportunity, show it by responding promptly or communicating when you will be able to respond. The speed of which opportunities come and go in this business is staggering, so right place at the right time is very applicable indeed.
  7. Make ’em look good! Or perhaps I should say ‘don’t make ’em look bad’. If you do not follow the advice above you will make your recruiter look bad and thus will be less likely to be able to help you in the future.

So, in the illustrious words of Jerry McGuire; ‘Help me help you!’ http://youtu.be/AGt5f70K02Q (however our disposition is slightly less desperate than Jerry’s in this scene)

Model Cars For Grown-Ups. Model Making in Formula One.

ADM from photopolymer resin

It has been a while since our last edition of our series of ‘The inner workings of a Fomula One Team’ articles, but there is actually some research that goes in to it; we want to be thorough and correct! Again the information is based on interviews with people working in the pertinent field.

This time we are taking a look inside the Model Making department and how (in general terms) they work . As you may know models in F1 are used for wind tunnel testing and experimental aerodynamic testing,  validation and data generation through telemetry. As opposed to the testing using CFD, they actually have to build a physical model of the car with all the intricacies that exist on F1 cars these days. Some teams use ‘smaller’ models, i.e. 40% scale of the full sized car, but they will always strive to test on at least a 60% scale model for more accurate results. Even though Teams are having to rely more on CFD than wind tunnel testing going forward due to regulations, wind tunnel testing remains an integral part of a Team’s process of achieving their goals on the track. A typical ‘model shop’ will consist of manufacturing and assembly groups. They manufacture the parts in many different materials from aluminum, carbon fibre, steel to the various metals and resins used in ADM, Advanced Digital Manufacturing or ‘Rapid Prototyping’. In the olden days they actually used wood and would have to rely on chisels and gouges to achieve the right shapes and angles. These days they use CNC machines and 3D printers using resins and metals cured with lasers, all fed instructions based on the designers’ specifications in the CAD generated drawings. Times have changed, haven’t they?

Essentially the designers will give the group the CAD from which they manufacture the parts for the model. Considering the can be up to 1 000 design changes per week during the season, the pressure from the design department is tremendous. Once the parts have all been made, the model is assembled and a test session is run. The wind tunnel is operated by wind tunnel technicians, which typically have and electronics and instrumentation background. The test is run by an Aerodynamicist who works with the model makers to make changes to the parts and to make sure the data is collected for analysis. This data is in turn interpreted by the Aero and design departments to make a case for implementing the design change on the full sized car. And around it goes again.

This department has traditionally been a great entry-point in to motorsport for apprentices, and still is. However, due to the lack of apprentices, as seen in the news lately (e.g. http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/lack-apprenticeships-holding-back-uk-3187201), candidates are sourced from other functions.  I actually spoke to a candidate the other day that started out as a cabinet maker before ending up making models, which does make sense really. Obviously CNC machinists/programmers, composite pattern makers and anyone with experience of 3D printing technologies have a natural fit in the manufacturing process. A degree from university is not necessary, but many times apprentices are brought in from Motorsport programmes from colleges, so it is competitive despite the diminishing apprentice pool. In terms of transferable skills you would be able to move to any function as a CNC programmer/machinist or composite pattern maker, depending on your function. However, you are also able to move in to operations management, e.g. production manager, if this is the direction you want to go. Key in this as many other areas is to keep yourself up to date and trained in new technologies as they move very fast.

The rapid prototyping element of model making is becoming increasingly common in all types of industries and even in manufacturing processes and thus it is a burgeoning market for good model makers. Hence it is certainly a skill set worth investing in for a life long career.

Below I have picked out a couple of videos to explain the technology and also give a glimpse in to the wind tunnel process.

As usual, keep an eye out for opportunities for model makers, CNC Machinists, Pattern Makers, etc on our website: http://www.resourcesinmotorsport.co.uk. It is also worth pointing out that this week, 3/3 – 7/3-14, is National Apprenticeship Week, to find out more follow: http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/awards/apprenticeship-week-2014.aspx